20 photos from NSW women’s State of Origin win

Players and coaches from both teams have warned against expanding the women's State Of Origin concept too quickly following the Blues' gripping 16-10 win over Queensland in the inaugural  fixture on Friday.

Karina Brown and Vanessa Foliaki embraced at the end of the inaugural women's State of Origin match on Friday. Photo: NRL Facebook

Karina Brown and Vanessa Foliaki embraced at the end of the inaugural women's State of Origin match on Friday. Photo: NRL Facebook

MORE: NRL defends photo of rugby players' kiss

The match was played as a one-off fixture with 30-minute halves.

Previous interstate challenge games have been played with 40-minute halves, although never before has the game been so intense in the wake of last year's Women's World Cup and in the lead-up to the forthcoming four-team premiership competition later this year.

For all that Friday's spectacle produced in front of almost 7000 fans at North Sydney Oval, women's rugby league is still a semi-professional pursuit, as evidenced by Blues captain Maddie Studdon's stunning revelation after full-time that she had lost her job during the week after being told she wouldn't be allowed time off to prepare for the match.

And while Friday's standalone was a ground-breaking success for the sport, NSW coach Ben Cross said it was crucial not to rush in expanding the game.

"For now I think the one Origin is a good concept. We're still in the infancy of knowing how the female rugby league athlete responds to these intense games, so trying to get them to back up in another two weeks for something of the same intensity is something that we probably need to work on with the NRL," Cross said.

"You've just got to wait for the game to grow a little bit. We don't want to accelerate the women's game too fast. It needs that underlying competition.

"Once that happens, maybe three, four to five years, I think three games."

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop